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99 replied to 99's discussion colloidal silver
"i have purchased some silver the make my own colloidal silver"
10 hours ago
99 replied to 99's discussion colloidal silver
"just add to the distilled water it is antimicrobial eg cleans your machine and is beneficial for keeping you healthy  from bugs germs viruses you get the picture and when you need to clean the humidifier out, put water on your plants the silver…"
10 hours ago
Mary Z left a comment for richard graham
"If the heated tube works with your machine I would try that.  They also make covers for your tubing which may help some.  I think the heated tube may be your answer.  Keep us posted."
13 hours ago
Mary Z left a comment for richard graham
"Richard, some folks just use the humidifier in a Passover mode.  They just don't turn it on, but let the air pick up moisture without heat."
13 hours ago
Mary Z replied to 99's discussion colloidal silver
"99, where have you been?  Do you add the colloidal silver to your humidifier?"
14 hours ago
Mary Z replied to Andy's discussion Resmed S8 AutoSet II - No Longer Collecting Data??
"I Andy, I realize I'm months behind your post.  I have no idea why your S8 would stoop collecting data.  I'm glad to hear  you're having such improvement with your apnea.  I have made great strides since I changed…"
14 hours ago
Mary Z replied to Andy's discussion Resmed S10 AirSense - Anyone have one? Any feedback?
"Andy, just found your post.  I don't know anything about this new machine.  How are you liking your new ResMed?"
14 hours ago
Mary Z left a comment for Kay Day
"Kay, I haven't been around myself and miss the old, active forum."
14 hours ago
Mary Z left a comment for richard graham
"Hi Richard,  I don't bother with a humidifier.  Someone on the forum suggested not using it and I'm a lot less congested without it.  A good AHI is under 5.  I use the Wisp and have been since it came out.  I think…"
14 hours ago
hifay replied to Mary Z's discussion Sleep apnea increases risk of osteoporosis
"Always something. Thanks for the information."
14 hours ago
99 posted a discussion

colloidal silver

a humidifier can be used with colloidal silverthis can keep the humidifier clean for day maybe weeks or longer without the need to clean the humidifiersilver colloidal is antimicrobial and you could just top up your humidifier without cleaning and at the same time treat your bodyor you just put silver on it own into the humidifierSee More
yesterday
richard graham posted a status
"I feel like the humidifier is making me feel yucky and I'm waking up hacking and having to clear my throat a lot for a while."
Nov 3
richard graham posted a discussion

what's a good AHI?

I've been using and auto and it says my AHI HAS been between 4 and 6 and wondering what's a good range.
Nov 2
Andy posted a discussion

Resmed S10 AirSense - Anyone have one? Any feedback?

Hi All,I've just ordered a new Resmed S10 AirSense, and I was wondering if anyone here has used one?Any information or input would be appreciated!See More
Sep 29
Andy replied to Andy's discussion Resmed S8 AutoSet II - No Longer Collecting Data??
"Hi All, Well, I went to the sleep doc today, and he ordered a new S10 for me! I still don't know why my S8 is not tracking data anymore. Anyone have any ideas?"
Sep 29
Oscar Lemus updated their profile
Sep 25
liz4cps commented on liz4cps's group Prince William Co, VA support group
"Just found they have a Facebook for the REMedy event, 1st Class Sleep REMedy Wellness Health Fair."
Sep 25
liz4cps commented on liz4cps's group Prince William Co, VA support group
"Reminder: REMedy event is this Saturday, 10 am to 2pm.  Topics include: Nutrition and Weight Management with Sarah Kelly, Registered Nutritionist/Dietitian Oral Appliance Therapy for Sleep Apnea with Drs. Rena Vakay & Lara…"
Sep 25
Kay Day left a comment for Kay Day
"September 1, 2014 My apologies to Sleep Guide for not participating in a long time. In January 2012 I started classes at the local community college (my husband is an instructor there, and my tuition is refunded when my grades are above a C. My…"
Sep 1
Mary Z posted a discussion

Sleep apnea increases risk of osteoporosis

Sleep apnea/osteoporosis study finds “increased” health riskA recently published study may have found a connection between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and osteoporosis, marking yet another health…See More
Aug 23
Sleep Apnea in dogs surgery... makes sense, but it didn't occur to me that dogs were actually having these procedures done: "Sleep Apnea is most common in flat-faced breeds, referred to as brachycephalic. (Brachy, pronounced "brakey," is Greek for short, and cephalic means head.) English bulldogs, pugs and Boston terriers are examples of brachycephalic breeds.

These dogs have tiny nostrils, an overly long soft palate, eversion of small sacs in the throat so they protrude into the airway and an underdeveloped trachea, or windpipe.

Sleep apnea also occurs in overweight dogs, because internal fat partially collapses the airways during sleep.

If your dog is overweight, help him lose enough weight that he is on the lean side of the normal range.

The standard treatment for sleep apnea is to surgically correct the dog's abnormal anatomy. Your veterinarian can give you an idea about cost and refer you to a specialist if you decide to pursue surgery.

If not, tell your veterinarian about your dog's sleep apnea. If chronic breathing problems have swollen his air passages, your vet can prescribe anti-inflammatory medication to bring down the swelling, enlarging his airway. If allergies are a factor, an antihistamine might help.

Finally, warm, humid weather makes it more difficult for dogs to breathe, so be sure it's cool where your dog sleeps. An air conditioner can help during the warmer months."

Tags: apnea, dogs, sleep, surgery

Views: 10953

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My dog has apnea, and REM behavior disorder. Jake's anatomy is the opposite of the dogs that were mentioned. He has a long snout. I wonder if being a mixed breed adds to is breathing problems.
Wonder if flat faced cats with small short nose, like the Persian breed, can have the same problem. Beside breathing problems they also tend to have eye problems.

I known a couple of normal looking, domestic short hair cat, with breathing problem--their breathing sounds loud, almost like snoring. Maybe it's caused by a problem with the airway.
I may have mentioned this before. Cats have sleep apnea (SA) like dogs. As Mike mentioned, it's usually the flat faced animals, but some of the larger dogs with long snouts have it too. My suspicion is that SA eventually leads to canine and feline "cognitive dysfunction syndrome" (equivalent to Alzheimer's in humans). We need some smart vet to develop a PAP machine for our pets.

By the way, I was watching the animal channel recently and learned all about the Great Dane. I was surprised to learn that their life expectancy was only seven years. I couldn't help but wonder if SA played a role.

What about the rest of the animal kingdom? Are there any other candidates. You can bet there are many examples, but I haven't seen or heard of any (yet).

Sonia S. said:
Wonder if flat faced cats with small short nose, like the Persian breed, can have the same problem. Beside breathing problems they also tend to have eye problems.

I known a couple of normal looking, domestic short hair cat, with breathing problem--their breathing sounds loud, almost like snoring. Maybe it's caused by a problem with the airway.
I know my son owned a Mastiff (the largest breed of this dog). Him and his wife treated that dog like a kid. They have a short life span as well. Vet said their average life span is around 7 years as well. I wonder if that is typical of larger breeds.

I don't know if their dog had sleep apnea though.
My dearest Blackie (Chihuahua) was diagnosed with Sleep Apnea...for course there is a relation of heart disease and sleep apnea. He was diagnosed with a hear murmur and in return his heart enlarged and this caused a disruption of his breathing because his heart kept on hitting his windpipe. I did get his weight under control and he slept ok for a while until his heart problems took a turn for the worst. And eventually he was put down a couple weeks ago because he was struggling to breathe due to his congestive heart failure. And he's resting peacefully now and I brought him home yesterday in a small cedar box. I'm adjusting to the changes and my cat (Elizabeth) is back to being my buddy again as she was prior to Blackie moving in. Last night she climbed onto my bed and headed under the covers, turned around and layed her head on my arm. These are behaviors that Elizabeth my cat shared with me prior to Blackie moving in. But I believe as it is in us humans that if you are overweight there's a chance that you will probably be affected with OSA/SA. And probably the same for any breed of dog. Dogs and Cats get cancer, diabetes, heart problems, etc...
Very timely discussion. I am making an appt today to take our little Alaskan Klee Kai to the teaching hospital at Colorado State University, where Lance Armstrong took his dog. They are experts at diagnosing.

Little Rose snores, wheezes, coughs and has a hard time breathing sometimes. She sleeps under the bed and wakes me up with her snoring. I was told that she has allergies, but the allergy medication is not working. So off we go to spend the day in Fort Collins at CSU vet services to see what the problem is and what we need to do to fix it.

Thanks for the discussion Mike. b
So interesting! I had no idea they were treating this in dogs! We know they have apnea, but this is the first time I have heard of treating it! So cool! ;)
I have a little Shih Tzu (properly pronounced Sheed-Zoo), sorry folks but it bugs me when people say Shit Zu. It's 2 words and the first one does not end with "t". She, Tangerine, is now 10 and has been snoring loudly for the past couple of years. Tangerine sleeps with me and it just breaks my heart to watch her, sometimes she stops breathing for a bit. I can't imagine torturing her with surgery, that would be so painful, and it really doesn't work that well with humans. I can't imagine a machine either...they nap so much you'd have to follow them around all day. I love her dearly and will cherish my time with her however long that may be.

Victoria...I'm so sorry to hear about Blackie ): I have lost several pets in my lifetime and it can really hurt. My cat, Mewsette, was 21 when I had to have her put down. She is with us still in her box with her nameplate with a kitty clock above her.

Again, I'm so sorry.
Sorry to hear about your loss Victoria. I would be crushed if something happened to my Jake. Truly crushed.
a year in a dogs life is not 365 days like us humans
i think that a year in a dogs life is something like four years that is 1*4
so a four year old dog is sixteen years of age
or a seven year old dog is 28 years old

Mack D Jones, MD, SAAN said:
I may have mentioned this before. Cats have sleep apnea (SA) like dogs. As Mike mentioned, it's usually the flat faced animals, but some of the larger dogs with long snouts have it too. My suspicion is that SA eventually leads to canine and feline "cognitive dysfunction syndrome" (equivalent to Alzheimer's in humans). We need some smart vet to develop a PAP machine for our pets.

By the way, I was watching the animal channel recently and learned all about the Great Dane. I was surprised to learn that their life expectancy was only seven years. I couldn't help but wonder if SA played a role.

What about the rest of the animal kingdom? Are there any other candidates. You can bet there are many examples, but I haven't seen or heard of any (yet).

Sonia S. said:
Wonder if flat faced cats with small short nose, like the Persian breed, can have the same problem. Beside breathing problems they also tend to have eye problems.

I known a couple of normal looking, domestic short hair cat, with breathing problem--their breathing sounds loud, almost like snoring. Maybe it's caused by a problem with the airway.
We've often commented that our dog Abbey has sleep apnea and needs a cpap. She snores so loud that guests usually think it's a person that's fallen asleep. She's a mix between a rottweiler and something hound-ish, maybe a beagle? Not brachycephalic, but she is also overweight.

I think there's a direct correlation between breed sizes and lifespans. The larger the dog, the shorter the expected/average lifespan. We were looking at wolfhounds once and their estimated lifespan was something like 4 years. Much too short!
Please remember that Colin Sullivan did his first CPAP/apnea research on dogs. He briefly mentions this in the first paragraph: http://www.sleepapnea.org/resources/pubs/pioneer.html

Also, there definitely is a tendency for smaller dogs to live longer, and for larger ones to live a shorter life. However, good care and appropriate genetic tendencies, can help. This is just as true for other animals as for human animals.

Our Dobermans both lived at least 14 years, which is pretty good for a larger breed. I believe their expected longevity is 10 years. There is some effort to breed Dobies, at least, for longevity: http://www.dpca.org/Longevty/longevity/

In the case of any dog, it is always too soon for the human to see the canine die, but...that does allow us room for some other canine to live in our homes, lives, and hearts. Of course, there is ALWAYS room in the heart for another dog, in my opinion. It is those other factors that adversely affect the quality of life of the dog that limit the number.

Karen

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