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It's ironic that before I was diagnosed with sleep apnea in 2000, I had no problem sleeping 8-9 hours a night. If I did wake up during the night, I had no problem falling right back to sleep, and I wasn't tired during the day.

From the first night I brought home the CPAP I haven't had one decent night's sleep. Not one. I don't have any problem falling asleep, but I can't stay asleep. At first I was waking up after 4-5 hours and couldn't get back to sleep for a couple of hours. Now it's more like 2-3 hours.

Last night was a perfect example. I went to sleep around 11:30. Woke up at maybe 2:30 (it was 3:14 when I finally checked the clock). Between 3:14 and 5:30 I dozed off a couple of times for maybe 30-40 minutes, then woke up again. I gave up at 5:30 and got out of bed.

My numbers are good. AHI is usually less than 3 and AI is usually 0.

I've seen sleep doctors, had more sleep tests done, and even tried therapy to no avail. I usually get the standard lecture about sleep hygiene. It's funny that my sleep hygiene must have been fine before the mask.

So the bottom line is my life changed for the worse when I got the mask. I don't sleep. I'm tired during the day. I don't feel like I'm the same person. Basically CPAP has had the exact opposite effect that it should have.

Anyone else have this problem? I would be interested to hear how you deal with it.

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I'm wondering: what prompted you to consider whether you have sleep apnea in the first place?

Also, waking throughout the night isn't uncommon especially as we (*sigh*) age.  I seem to wake every 90 minutes or so. This pattern probably track the typical, 90-minute sleep cycles.

Something that might help when you wake is to learn some self-hypnosis techniques and apply them when you wake. It also helps NOT to pay attention to the clock, something I used to do, which really kept me awake. Instead, try to think about pleasant, fun things: this will help to kick up the sleep-inducing delta waves in your brain.  By contrast, planning and worrying about things you need to do and/or problems you have tends to increase the wrong kind of brain wave activity and might make it harder for you to fall asleep in the first place or to fall back asleep if/when you wake during the night. Not good.

Finally, some do better with an APAP machine instead of a CPAP. You might consider this possibility.

Do not turn light on as this hinder you from falling asleep or choose red light instead which do not afect your sleep

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