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CPAP Supplies

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Stefan updated their profile
Sep 16, 2019
Profile IconBLev and bruce david joined SleepGuide
Aug 21, 2019
Right now I have a Respironics Remstar M Cpap and I have had to retitrate three times including the original sleep study and I am getting upset I don't have the time, patience and money to flush down the toilet in order to keep seeing these guys. I had and am still having issues with it, rainout, allergic to their fine filters (makes my nose run everytime I use them), not to mention my titration only lasts a few months and I feel like crap again and I have no card reader either.

I was wondering what to say to my docs to push the subject of getting a new machine, I want an Autopap, with humidifier and cardreader. Not to mention I think all the medical supply stores are ripoff artists ran by the mob. Get charged twice the amount for the machine as you should and they charge your insurance for it to!

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my understanding is that any of the following CPAP machines would be fine choices:  Philips Respironics System One Auto Adjusting CPAP (the one I am using at the moment),  ResMed S9 Auto Adjusting CPAP, or Fisher Paykel Icon Auto Adjusting CPAP.   I, too, used to use the RemStar but "married up" to the System One.

My CPAP machine has a humidfier and calibrated to a card reader. I had to experiment with the different types of temperatures and settings. Took me over a year to figure it all out. But when winter comes (I have forced hot air heat) the humidifier is very convenient for me on a number 3 setting. Summer is an issue since air conditioning makes it difficult to keep the temperature warm enough so I do not end up with nasal issues such as you discribe. I try warming my distilled water in a measuring cup a bit (just warm) and fill before bed. It does help. This spring pollen and mold and all the allergens will be very bad here in the east coast due to a early spring. So I expect I will be using allergy meds along with my CPAP to control the runny eye and nose. The medical supply houses want to sell what "they" are making the most bucks on through their suppliers. Talk to your doctor and ask if he can recommend some medication for your allergies before making a big investment on another machine.

Brett, I feel for you.  I've been at this four years and still don't have it right.  One thing you have to have is patience- this is a process and for some of us a long one.

With rainout turn down the humidity and maybe use a hose cover.  You have to get the allergies under control. Maybe with help experiment with different filter material. You should use the machine 100% of sleep time.

Tell the doc what you told us and ask for a trial of AUTO (if you're not 100% or near, compliant, forget that).  You want to be active in your treatment.

 

You can self titrate using a CPAP- I have. 1 cm up or down at a time, a week at a time, watch the numbers and how you feel.  If you're using flex try turning it off first week. (If you don't know how to change the settings go to apneaboard for directions)

 

Good luck.  Keep posting.  You're going to help someone else on the same journey.

 


I have other Health related issues such as polands syndrome, chronic pain and asthma. I would rather spend the money on a machine than running all the hell over town seeing this doctor and that doctor over and over. Total of eleven visits and six sleep studies. One with one without mask is too damn much!
Beverly Carter said:

My CPAP machine has a humidfier and calibrated to a card reader. I had to experiment with the different types of temperatures and settings. Took me over a year to figure it all out. But when winter comes (I have forced hot air heat) the humidifier is very convenient for me on a number 3 setting. Summer is an issue since air conditioning makes it difficult to keep the temperature warm enough so I do not end up with nasal issues such as you discribe. I try warming my distilled water in a measuring cup a bit (just warm) and fill before bed. It does help. This spring pollen and mold and all the allergens will be very bad here in the east coast due to a early spring. So I expect I will be using allergy meds along with my CPAP to control the runny eye and nose. The medical supply houses want to sell what "they" are making the most bucks on through their suppliers. Talk to your doctor and ask if he can recommend some medication for your allergies before making a big investment on another machine.

If you have a cpap or autopap with a smart card or better they said they can adjust my machine without another study so that is one other reason for a new machine.
Brett, I use the Resmed S9 Auotset and it fine for me. You have basic info on the LED and can get the data off the card. It is dearer than straight CPAP as it can do both. You set the pressure between certain pressures i.e. mine is 4-12 and it adjust between those pressures as needed. I have found it takes a while to come back down after it picks up apnea's and increases the pressure. I don't have the same problems with asthma etc as you but find it does the job for me.
Autopap is great. U can set a prescription and still have Autopap push other pressure rates . One does not cancelling out the other.

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