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learned from Dr. Guilleminault at Stanford today that low blood pressure corresponds with sleep apnea as well as high blood pressure. Knew all about the high blood pressure sleep apnea conection, which results from lack of oxygen in the system. Didn't know about the low blood pressure sleep apnea connection, which Guilleminault says stems from negative pressure that builds up in the chest cavity when the body's "motor" for getting air into the lungs, which is the diaphragm, fails to get the air into the body due to an obstruction, in my wife's case in her nasal passage.

Anyone else have low blood pressure issues or otherwise familiar with this phenomenon? I don't think this is either well document or well understood, so i wouldn't be surprised if we can't get anyone with any knowledge about this.

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Wow, that's interesting. I don't have badly low bp, but i have very good bp (which always surprises docs I think who expect it to be awful because I'm heavy).

Is this low bp all the time? Or something where the bp drops down really scary low while the person is sleeping?
Dr. Guilleminault has written a lot of papers on people with upper airway resistance syndrome and low blood pressure. There are other studies that show mostly young, thin women with "orthostatic intolerance" who get dizzy or light-headed when they stand up too quickly. They also tend to have cold hands or feet, and various nasal/sinus/headache issues. Interestingly, what I find is that as they age and slowly gain weight, the low BP becomes normal, and the cold hands get better, but later as they gain more weight (or after menopause in women), they'll have high blood pressure. Many young thin people with low blood pressure have at least one parent that have high blood pressure. I don't remember the exact mechanism, but I vaguely remember that it has to do with autonomic dysfunction. My wife has this too.
Yep, that was me, my entire life - except for dizzy and/or light headed. Until COPD. Now my BP tends to run in "normal" ranges. Still no problem w/high BP. Only the last 6 months weight gain - but the Crohn's could account for the lack of weight gain.
in my wife's case, it's chronically low blood pressure, not just during sleep, which is worst just when she gets up in the morning.

amott1973 said:
Wow, that's interesting. I don't have badly low bp, but i have very good bp (which always surprises docs I think who expect it to be awful because I'm heavy).

Is this low bp all the time? Or something where the bp drops down really scary low while the person is sleeping?
sure enough, Dr. Park, my wife indeed has "cold hands and feet, and various nasal/sinus/headache issues." And Dr. Guilleminault also noted that as we age and we put on more weight, the apnea gets worse, as does the sp02, which leads someone with low blood pressure to then have high blood pressure. if anyone's interested in doing a study, maybe i can convince my wife to be a subject ;-)

Steven Y. Park, MD said:
Dr. Guilleminault has written a lot of papers on people with upper airway resistance syndrome and low blood pressure. There are other studies that show mostly young, thin women with "orthostatic intolerance" who get dizzy or light-headed when they stand up too quickly. They also tend to have cold hands or feet, and various nasal/sinus/headache issues. Interestingly, what I find is that as they age and slowly gain weight, the low BP becomes normal, and the cold hands get better, but later as they gain more weight (or after menopause in women), they'll have high blood pressure. Many young thin people with low blood pressure have at least one parent that have high blood pressure. I don't remember the exact mechanism, but I vaguely remember that it has to do with autonomic dysfunction. My wife has this too.

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