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Ginny Edmundson replied to Ginny Edmundson's discussion Scheduled for evaluation and possible procedure next day
"As of now I no longer have to use a chin strap.  I am anxious about the sleep study.  Wondering if I will be able to sleep WITHOUT the CPAP….even thought I hate it it is a part of every night now and is what I am used to.  "
Sunday
Clueless in Redwood Shores replied to Ginny Edmundson's discussion Scheduled for evaluation and possible procedure next day
"I had it on the same outpatient basis.  Much pain, no long term gain.  I did not have the annual repetition - that might or might not have made the difference. "
Sunday
Mary Z replied to richard graham's discussion mouth breathing
"glad to hear it, Richard.  Keep us posted."
Apr 13
Mary Z left a comment for richard graham
"Glad to hear it's working, Richard."
Apr 11
richard graham replied to richard graham's discussion mouth breathing
"The chin strap is helping. Been having better sleep. Thanks Ginny and Mary for your help"
Apr 11
Ginny Edmundson replied to Ginny Edmundson's discussion Scheduled for evaluation and possible procedure next day
"Thanks, Mary~  Fingers are crossed.  My pressure is one point lower than when I began (7) and AHI is some lower (7 day average).  I am anxious about sleep study as I have not slept without CPAP in 2.5 years!   "
Apr 6
Mary Z replied to Ginny Edmundson's discussion Scheduled for evaluation and possible procedure next day
"Good job, Ginny Hope the sleep study shows some good results."
Apr 6
Ginny Edmundson replied to Ginny Edmundson's discussion Scheduled for evaluation and possible procedure next day
"Last procedure done!  This time he gave me meds to take before so less anxiety while waiting!  For the first time I was able to eat normal food on the way home after the procedure.  No pain after 12 hours.  If it only works.…"
Apr 5
Mary Z replied to richard graham's discussion mouth breathing
"Some folks run their humidifiers in passover mode- not turning on the heat just letting the air blow over the water.  That would not give any heat though. "
Apr 5
richard graham replied to richard graham's discussion mouth breathing
"Interesting, I actually feel a little better when I don't use the humidifier, but the humidifier helps with sinuses. The cold air stuff's me up. Gonna try running heat and a nasal spray"
Apr 4
Mary Z replied to richard graham's discussion mouth breathing
"Good luck with it- let us know how you do, Richard."
Apr 4
richard graham replied to richard graham's discussion mouth breathing
"I just picked up a new chin strap and will use it with my ultra mirage."
Apr 4
richard graham posted a discussion

nasal sprays

Just wanting some suggestions for some good nasal sprays to dry up sinusus. Thank you
Apr 3
richard graham replied to richard graham's discussion mouth breathing
"Thanks Mary"
Apr 3
Mary Z replied to richard graham's discussion mouth breathing
"I have both.  I use the chin strap with my Wisp and I also have a FFM if I choose to use that one. I'm a mouth breather.  I find nasal masks are easier to fit without leaks"
Apr 3
Mary Z replied to Mary Z's discussion Using comfort features
"Nasacort is now available without a prescription.  I personally use Afrin on the rare nights I need it for being stuffed up."
Apr 3
richard graham replied to Mary Z's discussion Using comfort features
"Mary, do you recommend a good nasal spray?"
Apr 2
richard graham replied to richard graham's discussion mouth breathing
"Wondering if mouth breathers do better with FFM"
Apr 2
richard graham posted a discussion

mouth breathing

I'm a mouth breather, and am wondering weather to get a chin strap or affm
Apr 2
richard graham replied to Mary Z's discussion Using comfort features
"I've been thinking about trying a nasal spray. Thanks that's useful info."
Apr 2

Can some one tell me about wether they have experienced  memery decline due to sleep apnea?

Have noticed improvement after starting cpap/apap therapy?

 How long did it take to notice improvement?

Tags: cpap, loss, memory, recovery

Views: 1785

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Replies to This Discussion

Apnea effects us in two very different ways. First we have the all talked about loss of oxygen. This loss by itslef can cause a cognitive loss on our functioning and memory. The second is the inrterruption in deep sleep. Right now while awake your body requires a certain amount of muscle tone just to hold your head up. As we enter the deeper stages of sleep we lose muscle tone to the point of paralysis in stage REM. This is a safety mechanism so that we do not act out our dreams. People with REM Behavior Disorder do not have this safet mechanism. As we relax or lose muscle tone our apnea becomes worse in stage 3 an REM sleep. As the Apnea becomes worse we lose the restoritive power of deep sleep. If we lose stage 3 sleep we do not heal properly and begin to age faster. If we lose REM sleep we lose the abilty to organize our brain. Conn put it best in computer terms. REM sleep is when we defrag or get rid of our cookies. Over time the lack of deep sleep makes us "foggy" or unable to remember simple tasks.
Hello-

It happens and you can fix it with a combination of CPAP and provigil.

you can use CPAP with a battery pack in places where no power is available and I have used it on an overnight airplane trip.

The brain makes memory in the hippocampus - which looks like 2 bumps at the base of the brain. One study using MRI shows a control group compared to OSA group where the OSA group has really smaller bumps - so it can be seen whether or not there is a loss of tissue. I expect that the person felt a change way before anything could be seen on MRI.

What happened to me--
I experienced dramatic memory decline to the point I had to take a medical leave from my jobs; I could not perform work that I had done just a few months earlier. This change was apparent to others and I had no idea why. I was working on a project to replace a legacy sytstem with new hardware and software, and the tasks involved learning the business and figuring out how to improve it. I also taught a class at night.

This what happened\
had I but known at each of these events that osa was really possible, I would not have had to suffer through all the rest--
2 years before: my blood pressure went up even though I was riding a bike 10 miles 3 times per week
1 year before: I am a software programmer and easy tasks became harder
3 months before: falling asleep on a plane and waking myself up by talking when I thought I was dreaming.
1 month before: warned at work about performance
-- resigned teaching job, took health leave
Sleep test: no doubt about sleep apnea!, started using cpap
next 2 months:
off work, sitting around, being dumb and not bored, enjoying repetative chores

3 months after: found new software analysis work providing expertise to a pilot project- I had to develop new methods and explain how they worked to all levels at the agency. And I could do this well with the CPAP.
So Holly,
How long would you estimate that you were experiencing some effects of OSA? Was it only when your Blood Pressure began to rise unexpectedly, or before? Has your BP returned to normal with no other treatment? It sounds like you adapted to CPAP treatment fairly quickly. That's great. Thanks for your encouraging story.
Hello-

The first time I had trouble thinking was right about the time my blood pressure went up. I was able to bring the bp down by exercising, however I gained weight again and use medication now. The weirdest thing was that I began to have trouble reading people's nonverbal cues so my responses were off target and it took more effort to communicate.
It took me a year to keep the mask on all night. I would start with it on, and take it off sometime in the night. I still hate it. I asked myself - if I was doing this and having a great time, what would it be? So I pretended that I was a deep sea diver or an astronaut where it was just part of the job. In my closet there are 4 or 5 masks that did not work for me when I was trying to find one that I could keep on. But I can't stand being dumb so I keep at it. Life is so much less interesting and fun then.
Holly
Yes, I have also experienced memory decline. In the first time I was very tired during the day and couldn't focus on my work. Then I noticed that I had forgot a few things - I could not remember passwords or missed important appointments. I was sad and realized that there was something wrong with me. After I had started my therapy (CPAP), my memory improved again and I felt much better. So I can really recommend a therapy, I am sure it will increase the quality of your life.
holly,
Thank u for the info.
How long did it take for u to realize objective benefit?
Did u ever come back to near normal state?
Did u notice any benefits with any meds or nutrition?
Did u have any neuro-psych testing?


Steph Serrano said:
Yes, I have also experienced memory decline. In the first time I was very tired during the day and couldn't focus on my work. Then I noticed that I had forgot a few things - I could not remember passwords or missed important appointments. I was sad and realized that there was something wrong with me. After I had started my therapy (CPAP), my memory improved again and I felt much better. So I can really recommend a therapy, I am sure it will increase the quality of your life.
The new research articles that came out this month have said in no uncertain terms that sleep apnea does affect memory. Part due to the significant sleep deprivation and part due to the damage done by the lack of oxygen and increase in bp caused by each event.

Over the multiple years I have cared for pts i can tell you that if you use your cpap and if you use your mind you will see a diffence that will slowly increase over a 6-8 month period. But that is not scientific that is just my experience.
I had a long history of memory and focusing difficulties. According to my Doctor, I have a fairly rare form of apnea and have probably had it to some degree most of my life. Post menopause increased the problem until I just was barely functioning, could not remember anything...even the day of the week. I could not process on my computer to do my post retirement contract jobs. I have been on CPAP for a little over a year. I am diligent about wearing my mask and rarely take it off for any length of time..though I have had to try many mask to find the best solution. Sometimes I even enjoy sleeping late or just lying in bed enjoying the practice of breathing in and breathing out with my air flow. I think that it helps me to think of it as a pleasurable experience that relaxes and energizes me. Sometimes I envision connecting with the universal energy...as in Avatar. All these visualizations have helped me become more accepting. I am so grateful that I live in a time when this is treatable. I have a deep internal sense of organization as well as much improved memory that I have ever had in my life. My doctor thinks that my memory function will continue to improve even though it may never be 100% that it would have been in younger years. The brain has a remarkable ability to continue to develop and grow throughout a persons's life. I practice using my memory and gain confidence that it will serve me well now. I will be 63 tomorrow and grateful to be well and alive.
I have had memory loss for some time now, but I hadn't connected it to sleep apnea, but this does make sense. I have had central and obstructive sleep apnea for about 10 years or more. I noticed that I have a hard time remembering the simplest things. I make myself notes daily to remind myself of what I need to do for the day. I have had problems with my work as well.
Thanks Holly, I could related to your story as I am with same professional background and been having similar problems. I am transitioning into more humanistic role in Project Management in software industry to better manage condition/lifestyle. Continue sharing your experience.

Holly Glaser said:
Hello-

It happens and you can fix it with a combination of CPAP and provigil.

you can use CPAP with a battery pack in places where no power is available and I have used it on an overnight airplane trip.

The brain makes memory in the hippocampus - which looks like 2 bumps at the base of the brain. One study using MRI shows a control group compared to OSA group where the OSA group has really smaller bumps - so it can be seen whether or not there is a loss of tissue. I expect that the person felt a change way before anything could be seen on MRI.

What happened to me--
I experienced dramatic memory decline to the point I had to take a medical leave from my jobs; I could not perform work that I had done just a few months earlier. This change was apparent to others and I had no idea why. I was working on a project to replace a legacy sytstem with new hardware and software, and the tasks involved learning the business and figuring out how to improve it. I also taught a class at night.

This what happened\
had I but known at each of these events that osa was really possible, I would not have had to suffer through all the rest--
2 years before: my blood pressure went up even though I was riding a bike 10 miles 3 times per week
1 year before: I am a software programmer and easy tasks became harder
3 months before: falling asleep on a plane and waking myself up by talking when I thought I was dreaming.
1 month before: warned at work about performance
-- resigned teaching job, took health leave
Sleep test: no doubt about sleep apnea!, started using cpap
next 2 months:
off work, sitting around, being dumb and not bored, enjoying repetative chores

3 months after: found new software analysis work providing expertise to a pilot project- I had to develop new methods and explain how they worked to all levels at the agency. And I could do this well with the CPAP.
My OSA came on very slowly over 10 years, and I know my memory declined, as my family told me. I quit a very high powered job, as I was exhausted all the time, yet I had been working for 30 years and was due to retire. During the 10 years, I repeatedly sought medical help, and went to the ER four times, but no one mentioned the possibility of OSA. I was put on various anxiety, depression, and sleeping medications, which I stopped as they only made things worse. I had a total workup from a cardiologist, and pulmonary team. No one suggested OSA. I trudged through each day, under a dark cloud but struggled to make the best of things

When skiing on vacation at over 9,000 feet for 3 days, I fainted. I was taken to an urgent care clinic and my oxygen saturation was low, and the doctor was pulmonary specialist working part time. He suggested I be tested for a sleep disorder. I left the high altitude area immediately, as he suggested, and had a sleep disorder test one month later, in 2008. I have moderate OSA, and I have a CPAP. I was frightened enough to be REALLY compliant with my CPAP, and it took months, but the fog lifted, and I began to feel SO much better. I am working part time again, at a fast paced job, and I seem to be able to learn new systems and react fairly quickly, and have been promoted twice. I have had no depression, or episodes like before. But, who can tell? Is my memory part of normal again (where the heck are those car keys?) or is it impaired? My daily functioning is good, but I do not have the energy that I used to have, but I am 60. Do I have good quality of life? Most of the time. Does my family like me better this way? Hope so. They love me anyway that I am, so who knows!

My questions are the same, what is normal? What should my memory be like? How would I compare memory ? Is my energy and cognitive processing normal? What the heck is normal, anyway? I still hate mathmatical issues, but that is not new. I do know every penny in the budget, because I am thrifty. I sit on boards, and do community service, and end up being the chair of the committees. I am highly organized, but now I try not to be so perfect at everything, as it is annoying. I seem to "get" social cues from others better now, as I am not foggy or exhausted, yet no one ever complained that I was poor at this while sleep deprived.


Normal aging? My mom died recently of dementia at 82, my father of heart disease. Come to find out that Dad was diagnosed with OSA years ago but would not use a CPAP, and never mentioned it to us. He had 5 brothers die of heart attacks in the 1950's before they were 50 years of age, and he had 8 bypasses (total) and 13 stents plus a pacemaker, so his life was extended greatly, to age 84. So my family history would make my questions of what is normal rather complex. Yet, I am engaged in what I choose to be, living a full and interesting life, and am doing what I can to participate. Life is pretty good most of the time, and I can ski, walk 3 miles daily, and no one mentions that I am zoned out, or "look exhausted" after being in bed for 9 hours. My nurse daughter watches me like a hawk, and she would certainly tell me if she felt I was declining. Also, my sister was recently diagnosed with OSA, but since she is younger, she knew sooner what was happening.

Hope my story helps. It is SO hard to be foggy and find a path toward wellness. Fighting masks and learning to deal with the issues would be challenging for ANYONE, yet those who are exhausted and defeated. When I went to the sleep disorders clinic, I was so frightened that the sleep professionals would find NOTHING wrong with me, and that if I did not have a sleep disorder, I would be simply crazy, and hopeless. The diagnosis gave me HOPE, and I found a way to fix my issues. Given that, I charged forward and did my very best to work toward wellness. OSA probably aged me quicker, but I have found a way to slow the process down. Now, on to the weight issues....but that is another story........and I am working on it.
The oxygen starvation from sleep apna effects the brain in many ways. In my case, I had depression and just some mild confusion. These symptons resolved over the course of a couple of months after starting C-Pap. I'm sure that it could take longer depending on how long and how severe the sleep apnea is.

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