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CPAP Supplies

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BeeAsleep posted a status
"Hi all. I am just checking in and saying hi after being gone for a long time. I am doing GREAT! Just got a new machine and mask. Feel like I"
Jan 23
BeeAsleep updated their profile
Jan 23
99 replied to Fred's discussion CPAP - cure worse than the disease
"Do not turn light on as this hinder you from falling asleep or choose red light instead which do not afect your sleep"
Oct 27, 2015
99 left a comment for Joan Williams Rice
"Hi Joan visiting pelham and I have osa"
Oct 27, 2015
99 left a comment for martha crabtree
"Hi maths visiting pelham "
Oct 27, 2015
99 left a comment for Rhonda Harrison
"Hi Rhondda I am visiting pelham and have osa "
Oct 27, 2015
99 posted a discussion

Leaky gut

Do you have a leaky gutHow would you knowA telltale sign for leaky gut is Athletes footI wish to ask do you have or suffer from itThe reason I ask is maybe this is a common denominatorJust text yes or text noAnd if you are the first to text also keep a tallyExample38 yes 0 noYour input would alter the tally39 yes 0 noSo now I will input first1 yes. 0 noSee More
Sep 26, 2015
richard graham posted a status
"For the first time in a while I got a whole night sleep with my machine but woke up beat and left side of my head feels weird, not sure if"
Sep 2, 2015
Brendan Duffy posted a status
"How did you slhttp://blog.aastweb.org/winners-and-losers-food-for-thought-sleep-and-athletic-success?utm_campaign=subscribers&utm_source=hs_"
Jul 9, 2015
Pat Kniel updated their profile
Jul 7, 2015
ZolliStar replied to Fred's discussion CPAP - cure worse than the disease
"I'm wondering: what prompted you to consider whether you have sleep apnea in the first place? Also, waking throughout the night isn't uncommon especially as we (*sigh*) age.  I seem to every 90 minutes or so. This pattern probably…"
Jun 27, 2015
ZolliStar replied to ZolliStar's discussion New mouth device on the market
"You can try this website:  http://zyppah.com/ I have a MAD (mandibular advancement device). Dr. Steven Park evaluated my mouth and throat (not everyone can use a MAD, it turns out) and pronounced me a candidate for it. The truth?  I…"
Jun 27, 2015
Mary Z replied to ZolliStar's discussion New mouth device on the market
"The link didn't work so me so I couldn't see the product.  I do have experience with a supposedly reliable boil and bite device.  I should know by now I have a small mouth and nothing regular size fits.  I don't think…"
Jun 27, 2015
richard graham replied to ZolliStar's discussion New mouth device on the market
"If I thought something could work other than this lousy cpap that would be awesome"
May 22, 2015
richard graham posted a status
"I moved and have been sick a lot and can't use cpap because of cough and I'm depressed a lot"
Apr 26, 2015
Fred posted a discussion

CPAP - cure worse than the disease

It's ironic that before I was diagnosed with sleep apnea in 2000, I had no problem sleeping 8-9 hours a night. If I did wake up during the night, I had no problem falling right back to sleep, and I wasn't tired during the day.From the first night I brought home the CPAP I haven't had one decent night's sleep. Not one. I don't have any problem falling asleep, but I can't stay asleep. At first I was waking up after 4-5 hours and couldn't get back to sleep for a couple of hours. Now it's more like…See More
Apr 13, 2015
Fred updated their profile
Apr 13, 2015
ZolliStar posted a discussion

New mouth device on the market

I've been hearing advertising for this product over the past few days.  It's sold as something to help snoring, but as I look at the information it seems to me that it would work just as well as my mandibular advancement device (MAD).In other words, this could help some of us with sleep apnea.Read about it here.Anybody have any thoughts about this?  See More
Mar 31, 2015
99 replied to Mary Z's discussion AHI finally under five.
"Hi Richard I mainly use an empty humidifier as it reduces noise"
Feb 16, 2015
richard graham left a comment for richard graham
"When I can afford it I'd like to get New machine with heated tube"
Feb 10, 2015
Does anyone here understand how the mechanic of ASV differs from CPAP?

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Yer yoking, right??? I'm still struggling to understand the Resmed VPAP Auto (bi-level auto) and I also have a Respironics pre-M Series Bi-PAP Auto w/Bi-Flex as a backup that I hope I never have to tangle w/and try to use!!! I did take it in and have my local DME supplier set it according to my in-lab titration but .... its the one I'm hoping to get the "stench" out of. The Adapt SV is some type of even more sophisticated bi-level I think.

I'll put Rock Hinkle on the spot:

He has the Resmed VPAP Adapt SV Clinicians Manual (in all fairness he only received it w/in the last 2 days or so) so maybe he'd like to stick his neck out and explain the differences and maybe he'll want to pass until he has a chance to study it a bit.

Daniel Levy should be able to explain perhaps since he is a DME supplier and I would expect will have had more experience w/them than Rock Hinkle who is a PSGT working on getting his RPSGT.
have learned that ASV (Adaptive Servo Ventilation) machines are basically bilevel machines with the added ability to adjust IPAP upward very rapidly (within one breath) if the sleeper looks like they won't reach the target volume or flow that the machine has been tracking.
I've actually asked this question of sleep doctors before and drawn either blank stares or assurances that the technological differences are so complex that i could not possibly understand them. perhaps so, but if a sleep doc has a command of the difference in the algorithms, then he should be able to explain it on some basic level to the lay person.

Mike said:
have learned that ASV (Adaptive Servo Ventilation) machines are basically bilevel machines with the added ability to adjust IPAP upward very rapidly (within one breath) if the sleeper looks like they won't reach the target volume or flow that the machine has been tracking.
The CPAP Provides a Constant Pressure this is quite effective for obstructive sleep Apnea. ASV in human terms will adjust the inhalation pressure so it will macth the normal breathing of the patient. This machine is for ones who have Complex Sleep Apnea ( Central Sleep Apnea). This is once again keeping it simlpe, is where the brain stops, or forgets to breathe.
so, if the machine notes a decraese in breathing..... it will turn up the pressure until the patient matches that pressure. then it will return to the standard presure (VEEP). I have only had to use an ASV a few times in the past year. Central sleep Apnea is not as common as Obstructive, and Bi-Level covers the patients who can not adapt tp CPAP. The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.
are you using VEEP interchangeably with IPAP?

Duane McDade said:
The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.
no the veep is all you can adjust..... the IPAP is on autopilot.

Mike said:
are you using VEEP interchangeably with IPAP?

Duane McDade said:
The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.
the veep is the exhalation pressure.

Duane McDade said:
no the veep is all you can adjust..... the IPAP is on autopilot.

Mike said:
are you using VEEP interchangeably with IPAP?

Duane McDade said:
The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.
With a SV machine only 1 pressure is adjusted to titrate the Clomplex Sleep Apnea Patient this is the VEEP. This is the exhalation pressure. This pressure stays the same and the Inhalation prussure varies as to the patients needs ....to control or flatten out the Central Apneas.
NO WAY! I have barely seen these machines. Let alone understand them. I have learned more about them from this forum than anywhere else I have looked. Even reading the manual(which I have not yet) without ever using the machine I would not even try to explain the differences between the 2. So Judy I will stay off center stage for this one.

Judy said:
Yer yoking, right??? I'm still struggling to understand the Resmed VPAP Auto (bi-level auto) and I also have a Respironics pre-M Series Bi-PAP Auto w/Bi-Flex as a backup that I hope I never have to tangle w/and try to use!!! I did take it in and have my local DME supplier set it according to my in-lab titration but .... its the one I'm hoping to get the "stench" out of. The Adapt SV is some type of even more sophisticated bi-level I think.

I'll put Rock Hinkle on the spot:

He has the Resmed VPAP Adapt SV Clinicians Manual (in all fairness he only received it w/in the last 2 days or so) so maybe he'd like to stick his neck out and explain the differences and maybe he'll want to pass until he has a chance to study it a bit.

Daniel Levy should be able to explain perhaps since he is a DME supplier and I would expect will have had more experience w/them than Rock Hinkle who is a PSGT working on getting his RPSGT.
How does an ASV or any auto titrating machine know the difference between OSA or CSA? if a pt is only wearing a mask what is the determining factor? How can a machine with one standard for biometric feed back tell if there is blockage or a complete lack of respiratory effort?

Duane McDade said:
The CPAP Provides a Constant Pressure this is quite effective for obstructive sleep Apnea. ASV in human terms will adjust the inhalation pressure so it will macth the normal breathing of the patient. This machine is for ones who have Complex Sleep Apnea ( Central Sleep Apnea). This is once again keeping it simlpe, is where the brain stops, or forgets to breathe.
so, if the machine notes a decraese in breathing..... it will turn up the pressure until the patient matches that pressure. then it will return to the standard presure (VEEP). I have only had to use an ASV a few times in the past year. Central sleep Apnea is not as common as Obstructive, and Bi-Level covers the patients who can not adapt tp CPAP. The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.
Rock, i have a ton of respect for you as a professional for coming forward and admitting to not knowing something. any professional can try to talk one step ahead of a lay person and pull the wool over his eyes as to knowing his stuff -- it takes a true pro to know when he knows or doesn't know something, and being willing to admit it.

Rock Hinkle said:
NO WAY! I have barely seen these machines. Let alone understand them. I have learned more about them from this forum than anywhere else I have looked. Even reading the manual(which I have not yet) without ever using the machine I would not even try to explain the differences between the 2. So Judy I will stay off center stage for this one.

Judy said:
Yer yoking, right??? I'm still struggling to understand the Resmed VPAP Auto (bi-level auto) and I also have a Respironics pre-M Series Bi-PAP Auto w/Bi-Flex as a backup that I hope I never have to tangle w/and try to use!!! I did take it in and have my local DME supplier set it according to my in-lab titration but .... its the one I'm hoping to get the "stench" out of. The Adapt SV is some type of even more sophisticated bi-level I think.

I'll put Rock Hinkle on the spot:

He has the Resmed VPAP Adapt SV Clinicians Manual (in all fairness he only received it w/in the last 2 days or so) so maybe he'd like to stick his neck out and explain the differences and maybe he'll want to pass until he has a chance to study it a bit.

Daniel Levy should be able to explain perhaps since he is a DME supplier and I would expect will have had more experience w/them than Rock Hinkle who is a PSGT working on getting his RPSGT.
this is worthy of its own thread, which i will break out on its own now.

Rock Hinkle said:
How does an ASV or any auto titrating machine know the difference between OSA or CSA? if a pt is only wearing a mask what is the determining factor? How can a machine with one standard for biometric feed back tell if there is blockage or a complete lack of respiratory effort?

Duane McDade said:
The CPAP Provides a Constant Pressure this is quite effective for obstructive sleep Apnea. ASV in human terms will adjust the inhalation pressure so it will macth the normal breathing of the patient. This machine is for ones who have Complex Sleep Apnea ( Central Sleep Apnea). This is once again keeping it simlpe, is where the brain stops, or forgets to breathe.
so, if the machine notes a decraese in breathing..... it will turn up the pressure until the patient matches that pressure. then it will return to the standard presure (VEEP). I have only had to use an ASV a few times in the past year. Central sleep Apnea is not as common as Obstructive, and Bi-Level covers the patients who can not adapt tp CPAP. The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.

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