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ZolliStar replied to Dan Lyons's discussion CPAP & Dry Mouth
"Dan, Do you use a chin strap?  If you're a mouth breather, you may need a chin strap so that your mouth stays closed. It's important to keep it closed throughout the night for a lot of reasons -- mouth, dental, etc., etc. I've…"
Nov 24
99 replied to 99's discussion Five Day Cure obstructI've sleep apnea
"Wed 9  9 mg Thursday 10 missed  Friday 11 9mg have insomnia  going skip rest until insomnia goes away Just did maths had my five days"
Nov 11
99 replied to 99's discussion Five Day Cure obstructI've sleep apnea
"Day after tomorrow I mean trump day wed 9 9mg "
Nov 9
99 replied to 99's discussion Five Day Cure obstructI've sleep apnea
"Day two Monday 7 Nov 9mg very relaxed Day three Tuesday 8 Nov 9mg sniffles appears to have stopped  must reduce dose"
Nov 8
99 replied to 99's discussion Five Day Cure obstructI've sleep apnea
"Start treatment again  Nov 6 @ 2100 first day "
Nov 6
99 replied to 99's discussion Five Day Cure obstructI've sleep apnea
"Day 5 not quite there must quit treetment for non and have at least a five day break But even so my health has improved "
Nov 1
99 replied to 99's discussion Five Day Cure obstructI've sleep apnea
" "
Nov 1
99 replied to 99's discussion Five Day Cure obstructI've sleep apnea
"Day three not so good with osa  DAY four better but still not quite there "
Oct 31
99 replied to 99's discussion Five Day Cure
"Day one immediate improvement to OSA but had insomnia and slight constapation Day two flatulence greatly reduced muscle tighten "
Oct 29
99 posted a discussion

Five Day Cure

I believe I have found a cure that only take five days which I am trialing now It has many benificial side effects as well by reducing snoring to name onePM ME as I do not want mainstream media to find out and have it banned as I fear that is how it will goWill try again after a little breakIn addition will increase omega 3And thirdly a chiropractic to realign atlas bone in spine is just a passing thought See More
Oct 28
liz4cps commented on liz4cps's group Prince William Co, VA support group
"BluePoint Medical* holding their next Remedy event on June 4 with Terry Cralle, RN on "Sleep in the Mordern Family".  They will also be checking CPAP machines and providing breakfast. Click on link above for more…"
May 7
Dan Lyons posted a discussion

CPAP & Dry Mouth

In recent months, I have developed extreme dry mouth as a result of the CPAP.  I am a mouth breather when using CPAP.Recently, I saw an advertisement for the symptoms of dry mouth, but as usual, when I need the information to have a discussion with both my primary care  physician and my dentist I haven't seen the ad. Has anyone else seen the ad and can anyone remember the info in the ad?Thanks in advance,DanSee More
Mar 30
richard graham posted a status
"My deductible is double what a machine is online but I can't get the machine set up. Any ideas?"
Mar 10
BeeAsleep posted a status
"Hi all. I am just checking in and saying hi after being gone for a long time. I am doing GREAT! Just got a new machine and mask. Feel like I"
Jan 23
BeeAsleep updated their profile
Jan 23
99 replied to Fred's discussion CPAP - cure worse than the disease
"Do not turn light on as this hinder you from falling asleep or choose red light instead which do not afect your sleep"
Oct 27, 2015
99 left a comment for Joan Williams Rice
"Hi Joan visiting pelham and I have osa"
Oct 27, 2015
99 left a comment for martha crabtree
"Hi maths visiting pelham "
Oct 27, 2015
99 left a comment for Rhonda Harrison
"Hi Rhondda I am visiting pelham and have osa "
Oct 27, 2015
99 posted a discussion

Leaky gut

Do you have a leaky gutHow would you knowA telltale sign for leaky gut is Athletes footI wish to ask do you have or suffer from itThe reason I ask is maybe this is a common denominatorJust text yes or text noAnd if you are the first to text also keep a tallyExample38 yes 0 noYour input would alter the tally39 yes 0 noSo now I will input first1 yes. 0 noSee More
Sep 26, 2015
Does anyone here understand how the mechanic of ASV differs from CPAP?

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Yer yoking, right??? I'm still struggling to understand the Resmed VPAP Auto (bi-level auto) and I also have a Respironics pre-M Series Bi-PAP Auto w/Bi-Flex as a backup that I hope I never have to tangle w/and try to use!!! I did take it in and have my local DME supplier set it according to my in-lab titration but .... its the one I'm hoping to get the "stench" out of. The Adapt SV is some type of even more sophisticated bi-level I think.

I'll put Rock Hinkle on the spot:

He has the Resmed VPAP Adapt SV Clinicians Manual (in all fairness he only received it w/in the last 2 days or so) so maybe he'd like to stick his neck out and explain the differences and maybe he'll want to pass until he has a chance to study it a bit.

Daniel Levy should be able to explain perhaps since he is a DME supplier and I would expect will have had more experience w/them than Rock Hinkle who is a PSGT working on getting his RPSGT.
have learned that ASV (Adaptive Servo Ventilation) machines are basically bilevel machines with the added ability to adjust IPAP upward very rapidly (within one breath) if the sleeper looks like they won't reach the target volume or flow that the machine has been tracking.
I've actually asked this question of sleep doctors before and drawn either blank stares or assurances that the technological differences are so complex that i could not possibly understand them. perhaps so, but if a sleep doc has a command of the difference in the algorithms, then he should be able to explain it on some basic level to the lay person.

Mike said:
have learned that ASV (Adaptive Servo Ventilation) machines are basically bilevel machines with the added ability to adjust IPAP upward very rapidly (within one breath) if the sleeper looks like they won't reach the target volume or flow that the machine has been tracking.
The CPAP Provides a Constant Pressure this is quite effective for obstructive sleep Apnea. ASV in human terms will adjust the inhalation pressure so it will macth the normal breathing of the patient. This machine is for ones who have Complex Sleep Apnea ( Central Sleep Apnea). This is once again keeping it simlpe, is where the brain stops, or forgets to breathe.
so, if the machine notes a decraese in breathing..... it will turn up the pressure until the patient matches that pressure. then it will return to the standard presure (VEEP). I have only had to use an ASV a few times in the past year. Central sleep Apnea is not as common as Obstructive, and Bi-Level covers the patients who can not adapt tp CPAP. The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.
are you using VEEP interchangeably with IPAP?

Duane McDade said:
The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.
no the veep is all you can adjust..... the IPAP is on autopilot.

Mike said:
are you using VEEP interchangeably with IPAP?

Duane McDade said:
The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.
the veep is the exhalation pressure.

Duane McDade said:
no the veep is all you can adjust..... the IPAP is on autopilot.

Mike said:
are you using VEEP interchangeably with IPAP?

Duane McDade said:
The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.
With a SV machine only 1 pressure is adjusted to titrate the Clomplex Sleep Apnea Patient this is the VEEP. This is the exhalation pressure. This pressure stays the same and the Inhalation prussure varies as to the patients needs ....to control or flatten out the Central Apneas.
NO WAY! I have barely seen these machines. Let alone understand them. I have learned more about them from this forum than anywhere else I have looked. Even reading the manual(which I have not yet) without ever using the machine I would not even try to explain the differences between the 2. So Judy I will stay off center stage for this one.

Judy said:
Yer yoking, right??? I'm still struggling to understand the Resmed VPAP Auto (bi-level auto) and I also have a Respironics pre-M Series Bi-PAP Auto w/Bi-Flex as a backup that I hope I never have to tangle w/and try to use!!! I did take it in and have my local DME supplier set it according to my in-lab titration but .... its the one I'm hoping to get the "stench" out of. The Adapt SV is some type of even more sophisticated bi-level I think.

I'll put Rock Hinkle on the spot:

He has the Resmed VPAP Adapt SV Clinicians Manual (in all fairness he only received it w/in the last 2 days or so) so maybe he'd like to stick his neck out and explain the differences and maybe he'll want to pass until he has a chance to study it a bit.

Daniel Levy should be able to explain perhaps since he is a DME supplier and I would expect will have had more experience w/them than Rock Hinkle who is a PSGT working on getting his RPSGT.
How does an ASV or any auto titrating machine know the difference between OSA or CSA? if a pt is only wearing a mask what is the determining factor? How can a machine with one standard for biometric feed back tell if there is blockage or a complete lack of respiratory effort?

Duane McDade said:
The CPAP Provides a Constant Pressure this is quite effective for obstructive sleep Apnea. ASV in human terms will adjust the inhalation pressure so it will macth the normal breathing of the patient. This machine is for ones who have Complex Sleep Apnea ( Central Sleep Apnea). This is once again keeping it simlpe, is where the brain stops, or forgets to breathe.
so, if the machine notes a decraese in breathing..... it will turn up the pressure until the patient matches that pressure. then it will return to the standard presure (VEEP). I have only had to use an ASV a few times in the past year. Central sleep Apnea is not as common as Obstructive, and Bi-Level covers the patients who can not adapt tp CPAP. The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.
Rock, i have a ton of respect for you as a professional for coming forward and admitting to not knowing something. any professional can try to talk one step ahead of a lay person and pull the wool over his eyes as to knowing his stuff -- it takes a true pro to know when he knows or doesn't know something, and being willing to admit it.

Rock Hinkle said:
NO WAY! I have barely seen these machines. Let alone understand them. I have learned more about them from this forum than anywhere else I have looked. Even reading the manual(which I have not yet) without ever using the machine I would not even try to explain the differences between the 2. So Judy I will stay off center stage for this one.

Judy said:
Yer yoking, right??? I'm still struggling to understand the Resmed VPAP Auto (bi-level auto) and I also have a Respironics pre-M Series Bi-PAP Auto w/Bi-Flex as a backup that I hope I never have to tangle w/and try to use!!! I did take it in and have my local DME supplier set it according to my in-lab titration but .... its the one I'm hoping to get the "stench" out of. The Adapt SV is some type of even more sophisticated bi-level I think.

I'll put Rock Hinkle on the spot:

He has the Resmed VPAP Adapt SV Clinicians Manual (in all fairness he only received it w/in the last 2 days or so) so maybe he'd like to stick his neck out and explain the differences and maybe he'll want to pass until he has a chance to study it a bit.

Daniel Levy should be able to explain perhaps since he is a DME supplier and I would expect will have had more experience w/them than Rock Hinkle who is a PSGT working on getting his RPSGT.
this is worthy of its own thread, which i will break out on its own now.

Rock Hinkle said:
How does an ASV or any auto titrating machine know the difference between OSA or CSA? if a pt is only wearing a mask what is the determining factor? How can a machine with one standard for biometric feed back tell if there is blockage or a complete lack of respiratory effort?

Duane McDade said:
The CPAP Provides a Constant Pressure this is quite effective for obstructive sleep Apnea. ASV in human terms will adjust the inhalation pressure so it will macth the normal breathing of the patient. This machine is for ones who have Complex Sleep Apnea ( Central Sleep Apnea). This is once again keeping it simlpe, is where the brain stops, or forgets to breathe.
so, if the machine notes a decraese in breathing..... it will turn up the pressure until the patient matches that pressure. then it will return to the standard presure (VEEP). I have only had to use an ASV a few times in the past year. Central sleep Apnea is not as common as Obstructive, and Bi-Level covers the patients who can not adapt tp CPAP. The reason that Sv's wont work for CPAP patients is the VEEP. This is your inhalation pressure on most machines this can not be set above 10cm/h20...... Some patients need much more than that to control their Apnea.

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